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The “Kiddie Tax” is Changing: What You Need to Know Now

Saving on taxes, while saving for your child or grandchild’s college education, just got a little trickier thanks to important changes in the “Kiddie Tax”.

The tax bill that was signed into law in December made some significant changes to how Uniform Gifts to Minors Accounts (UGMAs) and Uniform Transfers to Minors Accounts (UTMAs) are taxed.

What is the “Kiddie Tax”?

“The “Kiddie Tax” was first established in 1986 to keep parents from shielding income by placing investment accounts in the names of their children, who typically are in lower income tax brackets,” explains CPA Joshua Harris of Santos, Postal & Company. “The initial Kiddie Tax rules expired when a child turned 14. In 2008, this threshold increased to cover children through age 18 and full time students through age 23.”

How were Uniform Gifts and Transfers Taxed?

UGMAs and UTMAs have been a popular way to save money in a child’s or grandchild’s name precisely because of their significant tax advantages. A portion of the money earned – the first $1,050 of the child’s investment income (including interest, dividends and capital gains distributions) has been tax-free; the next $1,050 has taxed at the child’s rate; and investment income above $2,100 was taxed at the parent’s or grandparent’s “marginal” tax rate, ie the highest rate applied to the last dollar earned.

How is it Changing?

The 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act made an important change to this graduated “Kiddie Tax.”

Instead of a child’s investment income above $2,100 being taxed at the parent or grandparent’s individual tax rate, it will be taxed at the 2018 trust and estate tax rates:

 

Investment Income Trust & Estate Tax Rate
Up to $2,550 10%
$2,551-$9,150 24%
$9,151-$12,500 35%
Over $12,500 37%

Will You Pay More or Less?

How much you will pay depends on the amount of investment income and your own marginal tax bracket. As a rule of thumb, the more you have the more you may be taxed this year.

While the Tax Code changed with this law, it unfortunately did not get simpler. And one alternative, if your rates are going up, may be to consider rolling the UTMA or UGMA into a 529 plan. Because of the complexity, it’s a good idea to speak with your Financial Planner about how the new law affects you, and what your best alternatives are now among the wide array of educational savings plans.

Please give us a call if you’d like to schedule a free consultation.

This article was originally published on Shermanwealth.com

Sherman Wealth Management LLC (“Sherman Wealth”) is a Registered Investment Advisor (“RIA”), located in the State of Maryland. Sherman Wealth provides asset management and related services for clients nationally. Sherman Wealth will maintain all applicable registration and licenses as required by the various states in which Sherman Wealth conducts business, as applicable. Sherman Wealth renders individualized responses to persons in a particular state only after complying with all regulatory requirements, or pursuant to an applicable state exemption or exclusion.

This web post is intended to provide general information about Sherman Wealth. It is not intended to offer investment advice. Information regarding investment products and services are provided solely to read about our investment philosophy, our strategies and to be able to contact us for further information.

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Brad Sherman

About Brad Sherman

Brad Sherman has over a decade of experience in the financial services industry. He founded Sherman Wealth Management because he believes that every client deserves the highest level of individualized attention, regardless of their age or the size of their financial profile. He prides himself on being an advocate for his clients, providing a Fiduciary, fee-only service, designed to make clients feel comfortable with their investment choices and strategies. Brad lives in Rockville, Maryland, and enjoys football – both fantasy and real, baseball – especially his beloved Nats, and Nerf Ball with his young son.

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